Acupuncture Secrets for Obliterating Migraines – For Good!

The #1 Acupuncture Technique that Stops Migraines Cold

Nothing makes me happier than when a new Migraine patient comes to our Phoenix office for our unique style of Acupuncture Treatment. I hate migraines,  I really do.  And there’s just nothing more fun than helping someone who’s been suffering with Migraines for years, to finally get rid of their debilitating headaches.  Thanks to my teacher, The Great Dr. Tan, I feel like I’ve been given almost magical powers to get rid of migraines.

In truth, there’s nothing really magical about it – it’s just plain old science.  Mind you, it’s science from another culture, so it can seem a bit “mystical”, but it’s nothing short of science.

Balance Method View of Headaches

points_headIf we look at a Acupuncture Meridian Chart we see the head is covered by 8 seperate meridians.  A migraine can lodge itself in any one of these meridians and will often cover an area that is governed by more than just one meridian.  Knowing exactly which meridian or meridians are involved is the key to getting rid of the pain.

Many classic migraines will focus on the Gallbladder meridian.  That’s the Golden colored meridian on the image to the right. The Gallbladder meridian travels the whole length of the body and comes up the back of the arm and collects around the base of the skull.  If your a migraine sufferer, if you poke around the area where your neck and the back of your skull meet, maybe an inch off the center in either direction, you’ll probably find a real ouchy of a tender spot.  That’s Gall Bladder 20 (GB 20).

For many people a headache will start at GB 20 and come up the side of the head and lodge around the temples – a classic Gall- bladder headache.  Now at this point, a lot of my patients will say, “Hey Doc, I had my gallbladder removed in ’78! How can I be having a ‘gallbladder headache’?”

Don’t get too hung-up on the names of these meridians.  Most of them are pretty loose translations from the Chinese and have little to do with the Western Organ whose name they share.  Gallbladder is actually called the Foot Shao Yang Meridian, and while there is a drop of overlap between it’s function and the Western anatomical gallbladder organ – the meridian concept of gallbladder contains so much more.  So yes, even if you don’t have a gallbladder you can have a gallbladder headache.

Acupuncture to Finally Balance Your Noggin

Now, using our example of our Gallbladder headache, now that we know what meridian is involved, what do we do now?  Just stick a bunch of needles in the gallbladder meridian?  Please no! This is how much of Acupuncture is done in modern times and it’s really been reduced to a form of trigger point massage just using needles instead of thumbs!

Classical, Balance Method Acupuncture looks deeper and asks “If there’s a problem with the flow of Qi in the Gallbladder meridian, well what controls the gallbladder merdian?”.  The classical teaching show us that Gallbladder meridian can be influenced most effectively through the San Jao, Liver and Heart meridians.

Knowing this is like knowing the secret code to shut that migraine down straight away.  When we apply our Acpuncture Technique to the San Jao, Liver and Heart meridians in a very specific pattern, the patient with the Gallbladder Migraine is shocked at the near instant relief they experience.  It’s literally like someone finally found the pain switch and flipped it to off!

This is the power of Balance Method Acupuncture technique and we feel blessed to see it in action everday at our Phoenix clinic.

In our next installment will talk about once that migraine is gone, how do we get it to stay gone!  This is where it gets fun!

imfl-conversations-accupuncture_treatmentNow, let me hear from you.  How have Migraines impacted your life?  What kinds of treatments have you tried and did they have any unpleasant side-effects?

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